Somers Orthopaedic Doctors in the News

Podiatry Specialist Dr. Alan Berman Offers Tips for Seniors with Big Toe Joint Pain

October 15, 2013

Never underestimate the power of a little joint to cause big problems. But that's what can happen to senior citizens suffering from big toe joint pain - often as a result of arthritis - which can not only sour the mood and lessen quality of life, but raises the risk of falling and in many cases proves disabling, according to Alan Berman, DPM, of Somers Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine Group, PLLC. (more...)

Cheap shoes lead to blisters and calluses

Geoff Williams 10/7/13

It is good to save money, most people are taught from an early age. If you have a coupon, use it. If you aren't going to be in a room, turn off the lights. Buy those holiday decorations after December 25. And on and on.

But being frugal can also backfire: Just visualize what might go wrong if you bought a really inexpensive smoke alarm, or brakes for your car. Here are three categories in which you should pay careful attention to what you're spending.

Footwear. "Cheap shoes lead to blisters and calluses," says Alan Berman, a podiatrist who practices at Somers Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine Group in Carmel, N.Y. "I live close to New York City, and we'll often see someone come in with a stress fracture because they've basically been walking the streets barefoot, even though this foot-covering, so-called shoe is on their feet."

Rather than buying based on price, Berman says, consumers should look for a shoe with a strong, rigid heel counter (at the back of the shoe) and a strong and sturdy arch. He would also like to see some flexibility in the toe area and, if we're talking sneakers, perhaps some mesh for breathability.

More often than not, that's going to be a more expensive shoe. Berman likes Aetrex and New Balance, which aren't cheap (prices vary widely, but Aetrex is typically around $100 or more; New Balance is typically around $50 and up).

"If you can bend the shoe in half, wrap it up and fold it in your pocket, it's not a very good shoe," Berman says.

(more...)

Football Injury Prevention

BWWFitnessworld.com, September 17, 2013

Sports medicine specialist Dr. Scott Levin offers young players tips for preventing football related injuries.

For many years, the number of student athletes playing football at the high school level has far surpassed the number of participants in any other sport. During the 2012-2013 season, more than 1.1 million boys played tackle football and 8,600 girls played tackle or flag football at the high school level, according to the National Federation of State High School Associations. And USA Football estimates that there are 3 million youth football players, age 6-14, in the United States.  (more...)

Exercises That Can Cause More Harm Than Good

DIGITAL JOURNAL

August 29, 2013

Physical therapist Matt Mikesh with Somers Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine Group offers tips about exercises that can cause more harm than good.

Exercising is a crucial factor in maintaining a healthy body and mind. This is a commonly known fact and 76% of American adults report that they engage in regular physical activity. Yet according to physical therapist specialist Matt Mikesh with Somers Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine Group, practicing certain exercises can cause more harm to the body than good. “I see many patients who come in because they have injured themselves working out,” says Mikesh. How can we remain physically active, exercise regularly and at the same time protect ourselves from exercise injury? Mikesh offers the following tips to help us prevent exercise related injury and suggests certain exercises to avoid. (more...)

Shoe Inserts Don't Help Arthritic Knee Pain: Study

WebMD News from HealthDay, By Steven Reinberg

TUESDAY, Aug. 20, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Lateral wedge shoe inserts don't appear to relieve pain in patients suffering from osteoarthritis of the knee, a new study finds.
These inexpensive plastic inserts (or insoles) are designed to shift body weight from the inside of the knee to the outside in hopes of reducing pain, but, according to a review of 12 studies, they don't do the job. (more...)

Orthopaedic Surgeon Dr. Jeffrey Yormak Responds to Research on Rotator Cuff Injuries and Surgery

 

 

 

 

July 31, 2013

A pair of new studies indicate that most patients with rotator cuff injuries respond well to non-surgical treatment, and a key predictor of who benefits most from physical therapy may simply be who expects to. This is good news for those coping with rotator cuff injuries, the most common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults, according to Jeffrey Yormak, MD, FAAOS of Somers Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine Group in New York.

Tips for Understanding Torn Meniscus Treatment

Stuart T. Styles, MD, FAAOS

HealthNewsDigest.com) - Carmel, NY, July, 2013 - Knee problems send almost 20 million people to a doctor's office each year. Injuries to the knees are common to all sports and cumulative wear and tear on the knee sends large numbers of older people to doctors' offices as well. "The knee is vulnerable to injury because it is a hinged joint," says Dr. Stuart Styles, knee treatment specialist with Somers Orthopaedic Surgery & Sports Medicine Group. "That means it moves in two directions as it bends and straightens, but in a single plane. When forces are applied to the knee from outside that plane - as in, say, a football tackle - injury is likely to one or more of the components of the knee: the bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, or tendons."  Meniscus tears are among the most common knee injuries, occurring in people of all ages, both athletes and non-athletes. According to Dr. Styles, "The first question many patients ask about a torn meniscus is 'can it be fixed?' Yes, most of the time a torn meniscus can be successfully treated, but not all meniscus tears need to be fixed."

Tips for understanding torn meniscus treatment (more...)

Why Trail Running Is Good for You

Runner's World Home

There’s a reason trail running is booming in popularity… a few reasons, actually.

By Lisa Jhung; June 2013
Trail Runner

Heading out on a trail instead of pavement is appealing for so many reasons. Escaping into the woods or meadows gives you a nature experience that a road run often cannot, and a trail's softer surface gives your body a break, too. The benefits of trail running span the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual areas of your life. And doesn’t that cover pretty much all of it? Here are a few ways trail running is good for you and some tips on how to get started.

Good for Your Body
“Trails are going to take away a lot of stress from the impact that you’d normally get running on harder surfaces,” says Dr. Scott Levin, a New York-based sports medicine expert and orthopedic surgeon. “Some of the forces that would normally be transmitted from the pavement up to the ankles, knees, shins, and hips are dissipated when the foot hits the ground on the trails because there’s some give there.” (more...)

Mountain Biking Injury

Scott M. Levin, MD., FAAOS - Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon

Carmel, NY, June 2013 - There's something about summer that makes the idea of hopping on a bike and heading for a rugged trail nearly irresistible. Three decades after the sport began with only a handful of enthusiasts, mountain biking has surged in popularity. The non-profit Outdoor Foundation estimates that nearly 7.1 million people now participate in this adrenaline-pumping outdoor activity. But each trail's bumps, peaks and vertical drops also bring the potential for mountain biking injury. "Recreational mountain bikers - who don't compete in the sport and do it just for fun - may forget this exciting pastime comes with potential risks," says Dr. Scott Levin.  "But taking simple protective measures can keep mountain bikers safe on the trail for a long time to come." (more...)

How to Cope with Pregnancy Foot Pain

FoxNews.com

An interview with Alan Berman, DPM - Podiatrist, By Julie Revelant, June 23, 2013

If you’re pregnant, you probably can’t wait to get home and put your feet up.

If your feet hurt, you might have plantar fasciitis, a condition that affects about 10 percent of the population - and probably occurs more frequently in pregnant women, according to Phil Vasyli, podiatrist and founder of Orthaheel and Dr. Andrew Weil Integrative Footwear.
Here, find out exactly what plantar fasciitis is, what causes it and what you can do about it. (more...)